RailsConf: Nick's Highlights from Windy City Rails

I attended and spoke at Windy City Rails. I tried to take more notes this time. Out of 6 talks an lightning talks, I have ~500 lines of notes. Enjoy!.

Jake Scrugges - Metrics Based Refactoring: What To Do With Your Code Metrics

  • Metric-Fu is a ruby metric bundle
  • rake metrics:all
    => generates a master report of a bunch of metrics
  • There are a lot of metrics, where do you start?
  • Everyone wants to refactor, but where do you start?
  • Flay
    • Analyzes code duplication
    • Finds violations of DRY
    • Solutions: Extract Method, Modules, etc.
    • Single Responsibility Principle
  • Churn
    • Looks through your commits to see what stuff changes the most
    • Files that change the most are "God Objects" - stuff that does everything
    • Any time anything changes, the God Object has to change
    • Bad smell, should be smaller objects with greater focus
    • Tells you where your most volatile code is
  • Rcov
    • Main reason metric-fu blows up
    • Problem is, metric-fu is mostly static analysis, but rcov is running the code
    • Rcov runs the test suite, which is sometimes hard to get working
    • Rcov makes sure your coverage is good where it needs to be (most complicated and volatile code)
    • Writing tests for the sake of coverage is harmful
    • Write tests when you are in the code and you understand it (not a week later, "let's write some tests!")
  • Flog and Saikuro
    • Both are complexity management
    • Saikuro (pronounced cyclo as in cyclomatic complexity) measures cyclomatic complexity
    • Saikuro = number of paths through the code, and cyclomatic complexity is exponential in growth
    • Flow looks at branching, but uses ABC
    • Assignments
    • Branches
    • Calls
    • Flog generates a score based on ABC
    • \< 20 is good, 20-40 is a grey area, 40-60 is a warning, 60+ is FIX IT!
    • How do you fix it?
    • Extract method
    • Missing object (need a new class to handle this behavior)
    • If that doesn't work, re-architect
    • Seriously, you don't need complicated methods in any app
    • Director method: calls a couple of sub methods, doesn't do much actual work
    • Take care not to over-factor. If you are a guest in the code, just clean it
      as necessary. You don't need to fully re-organize.
  • Reek, Roodi, and RailsBestPractices
    • Reek: if it could possibly be a problem, I'll tell you
    • Roodi: only if I'm really sure, I'll tell you
    • RailsBestPractices: just rails stuff
    • All parse the code and look for design problems
    • Very ambitious! Code trying to understand what you're trying to do
    • Awesome because you can look up the definition of the problem and see how to fix it.
    • Trouble because it's a machine trying to identify human problems, which is difficult
  • Continuous Integration
    • Metric-fu on your code
    • Most CI's allow you to have artifacts for a build
    • J.S. runs his nightly at midnight
  • Pay attention to trends over time
    • Is your refactoring making things better?
    • Did the last feature skyrocket flay scores?
    • How is the influx of new developers affecting the code quality
    • Did the highly paid consultants produce good work?
  • Take metrics as advice (not law)
    • It is a tool, use it intelligently (like a GPS system)
    • Don't let a manager get in charge of this
    • Up to you and your team to establish conventions and stick to them
  • Coming soon
    • Fail the build on bad metrics
    • Resisted for a while because there may be false negatives
    • Failing a build is a serious incident, needs to mean something
    • Metrics are not as definitive as tests
  • Coming later (and/or soonish)
    • Meta metrics
    • Imagine a report that flagged a method as having high churn, poor coverage, and high complexity
    • This method is trouble waiting to happen
    • No so easy to write this feature
    • J.S. needs help!
    • Need to re-architect the system to understand classes and methods, not just lines of code
  • Questions
    • Can you use other source control?
    • I think so, check out the churn gem
    • How is the performance?
    • Not great, but you only have to run it once a day
    • If you don't have test coverage, now what?
    • start w/ rehacktoring (refactoring w/o tests)
    • do that until you understand it enough to write tests
    • write tests!
    • What about front-end heavy stuff? Javascript?
    • No idea! These are all ruby tools. Maybe there are JS tools out there?
    • You should test your javascript. Sapphire is the "new hot thing".

John McCaffrey - Analyzing and Improving the Performance of your Rails Application

  • http://railsperformance.blogspot.com
  • O(n) queries is bad
  • Code he refactored went from 2811 to 17 queries per action
  • Leverage: small amounts of work for large amounts of value
  • Delay directly correlates w/ loss of revenue
    • Bing: 1s = 2.8% decrease, 2s = 4.3%
    • Google: users that had a delay for a short period of time, actually searched less even after the delay was removed.
    • Yahoo: added a 400ms delay and users bailed before the pages even loaded
    • Shopzilla: reduced delay from 6s to 1.2s.
    • Conversion rate rate up 7-12%
    • Saved infrastructure costs by 50%
    • Release cost decreased
  • Fred Wilson (VC): Speed is #1 of the 10 golden principles of successful web apps
  • So where to begin?
  • Anti-patterns:
    • "Scalability can be sprinkled on later"
    • Guessing, not testing
    • Ad-hoc, unstructured
  • "Premature optimization is the root of all evil" - Donald Knuth
  • "If you can not measure it, you can not improve it" - Lord Kelvin
  • Measure
  • Repeatable tests
  • Isolate your changes
  • (Scientific method!)
  • Visibility is important for working on a team
  • Response time = latency
  • Requests per second = throughput
  • Load, utilization, scalability, throughput, concurrency, capacity
  • Performance != Scalability
    • Performance = response time
    • Scalability = ability to grow to more requests
    • Adding more workers will not improve latency
  • Twitter: dynamic html = 250ms, but 3369ms is static assets
    • Don't waste your time on the 250ms, go for the big slow chunks
  • Walmart: 3 redirects, 388ms dynamic, 4580ms static content
  • Use YSlow
    • Do less work
    • Distribute content
    • Cache
    • Compress
    • Fight queued work
  • Google page speed
    • similar to yslow
    • includes paint events
    • separates out ads and trackers from your site
    • "how fast it feels"
    • If the web is faster, they make more money
  • http://www.showslow.com/ tracks your site (or competitors, will check every 24h)
  • http://webpagetest.com/ runs page speed and yslow for you, and show progressive rendering
  • http://gtmetrix.org
  • http://zoompf.com
  • http://loadimpact.com
  • http://gomez.com
  • See Greg Pollack's Scaling Rails series
  • Majority of the Alexa top 1,000 sites don't do even the easiest things
    • 42% don't gzip
    • 44% >2 css files
    • 56% serve css from a cookied domain
    • 62% don't minify
  • Gzip is the simplest and smartest thing you can do
  • Minify js
    • jsmin, yuicompressor, sprockets
    • Asset packager
    • javascript_include_tag :cache => "cache/all"
  • Sprited images
  • Spriteme.org
  • JqueryUI gives you sprited images
  • Image optimization
    • Smush.it
  • Expires and browser caching
  • Set a far-future expire to tell the browser it can cache it
  • Combined with a query string lets you version a file
  • Rails Caching: make the static parts of your dynamic content cached
  • railslab.newrelic.com
  • request-log-analyzer
  • Rack::Bug
  • NewRelic
  • Scout
  • Get on the heroku mailing list / blog to learn about scaling issues
  • Apache bench
  • httperf
  • jmeter
  • Database issues
  • http://github.com/eladmeidar/rails_indexes
    • rake tasks to find missing indexes
    • columns that need to be sorted
    • lookup fields
    • columns used in a group-by
  • http://github.com/samdanavia/ambitions_query_indexer haven't tried it yet, check it out
  • http://github.com/sdsykes/slim_scrooge Instruments your code and looks for bad "select *"
  • Aman Gupta
  • Joe Damato
  • http://timetobleed.com/
  • http://memprof.com/
  • yajl-ruby for C++ extension json parsing
  • Ruby 1.9 for massive performance

Kevin Gisi - It's time to repay your debt

  • We're leveraging an awesome framework and language, and it's time to give back
  • Releasing gems is easy
  • (Showing some code to refactor out into a gem)
  • Ruby community has an incredible (and overwhelming) amount of choice
  • Choice is good and important
  • There exist incomplete and unstable solutions
  • You should release a "product", not an incomplete solution
    • Aesthetics
    • Utility
  • Agile: Do the bare minimum to get something delivered
    • (Nick: isn't it to embrace change?)
  • Delivered: coded, deployed, supported, tested, extensible, usable by the client
  • Treat open source libraries and client deliverables
  • The Lazy programmer's manifesto
    • I want to write code once
    • I want to be able to read code w/o docs
    • I want to be able to rely on libraries
    • I wants to use adaptable solutions for numerous problems
    • I want to always be working on something new
  • Idea filtering
    • To share
    • business value
    • practical use
    • To learn
    • no requirements
    • don't post it publicly (community does not value your stupid web framework)
  • Testing
    • We all say we do it (it's time to start)
    • RSpec and Cucumber are easy to set up
    • Design verification tool
  • (really turning into a rant at this point)
  • Extensible
    • Write clean code (don't post spikes)
    • Peer review
    • Follow the Unix philosophy: do one thing really well
    • Leverage other gems
  • Documentation
    • Who's looking at your code?
    • RDoc, YARD, etc
    • Getting Started
    • Blog post!
  • Supported
    • If you can't maintain your app, don't post it
  • Be Honest
    • Hand over the reigns if you can't support it
    • Be a net positive
    • Don't announce things that aren't done
  • If you have to
    • Put it in a limited venue
    • Add a disclaimer
  • The internet doesn't filter bad ideas very well
    • It does make things hard to do if they don't work well
    • Having enough eyes
  • "Ruby treats you like a grown up programmer" - Matz
  • What happens when grown-ups have too much fun?
  • How to be a good parent
    • Avoid sensory overload
    • Sometimes spoon feed
    • Remember you're used to the status quo
    • Be a mentor http://railsmentors.org
    • Provide solutions to problems, not blocks of code
  • (I wish this was a "how to do a good job" and not "you suck, stop sucking". I think he wants to be the king of the rubygems app store)

Lightning Talks

Micah Martin - Limelight

  • Tool to build GUIs in ruby
  • Built a gui calculator in 5 minutes

Sean Scofield - The Awesome Power of Rails Engines

  • Engines make it easy for frameworks to be built on top of rails
  • Engine is a complete application that can provide the stuff rails apps provide
  • app directory is auto loaded
  • You can supply models, views, controllers in your engine
  • You can override locale by dropping it in app
  • Engines extending engines, for example Spree
  • Bundler ties it all together

Mike Buselli - Brush::Pipeline

  • Running external OS commands
  • sys
    • lower level, more convenient for specific takss
    • chaining commands
  • pipeline
    • better at chaining commands
    • pipeline ['head', 'README'], ['tail', '-n2']
    • Each part of the pipeline can run in different directories
    • stderr and stdout redirection
    • argv[0] renaming
    • restrict access to open files
    • Works great on POSIX including cygwin

Chris Hallendy and Nick Lewis - Realtime Apps

  • Demo of node.js \<-> Redis \<-> Rails

Joe Fiorini (sp?) - Web Katas

  • Problem: web developers don't know http
  • Rails is big and awesome, but it's hard to troubleshoot
  • It allows us to ignore how http works.
  • Code Katas http://bit.ly/codekatas
  • No-framework webapp development (Rack) to learn how http cookies work
  • More Katas

Jim Remsik - Improv: Comedy to Coding

  • Programming is a people problem
  • You write code for other people
  • We use ruby because it is expressive and easy for others to read and maintain
  • Improv after-hours at hashrock
  • Yes-and, drop your preconcieved notions at the door
  • Support your team

Malcolm Arnold - Ruby Nuby

  • Brand new social movement dedicated to teaching ruby on rails to disadvantaged youths
  • Maximize social good by spreading ruby

Praveen Alavilli - Monetizing your apps

  • "chase your dream, money will follow"
  • Still a mystery to a lot of people how the money follows
  • Indirect
    • advertising
    • offers
    • referalls
  • Direct
    • e/m-commerce
    • freemium
    • causium (donate money to a cause)
    • pay as you use
    • free to use pay for service
    • premium content
    • digital goods
    • virtual currency
    • subscriptions
  • Challenge: apply these models to your use cases
  • Gateway (i.e. Payflow, Authorize.net)
  • Checkout (Google, PayPal, Amazon)
  • Platform (PayPal, Amazon)
  • Also services on top (Chargify, Spreedly, Freshbooks)
  • Choose one that works the best
  • Your users need to be able to pay somehow, should not be hard to pay
  • PCI compliance for charging directly
  • secure and privacy enabling
  • Adaptive Payments API

Ryan Singer - Weaving Design and Development

  • UI Design and Programming, working together
  • (telling a story about working with a startup and doing design for them)
  • Designer says "let's change this button" while pairing with dev, dev makes the change instantly
  • XP is focused on delivery
  • In XP, feedback loops are not as important
  • Feedback can be difficult if you are purely focused on delivery
  • Shared code base, code runs on designers computers
  • Avoid the designer w/ folders full of PSDs and static content
    • Becomes a spec, then the dev has to implement it
  • Static files are like spikes, for exploration and experimentation
  • Actual changes need to keep up with the codebase
  • At 37Signals, no sync problem, because the designers are working in the code base
  • HAML and Mustache are out, because designers can't deal with them
  • Templates with logic
  • Avoid helpers writing HTML and presenters writing html
  • Start together, don't bring the designers in late, or the developers in late
  • Architecture before design leaves UX to too late in the process
  • Designers starting everything before programmers start, it may be impossible or impractical to code
  • P&D decide on domain language and basic model
  • P stub models, controllers, routes, and templates
  • D few days lead on designing and building templates
  • Simultaneous
    • P design and build models, controllers, routes, helpers, dynamic templates
    • D design and build templates and helpers
    • Repeat this process continuously
  • Share the codebase
  • All views are in templates w/ logic (ERB or similar, not HAML)
  • Start together for domain language and models for communication
  • constantly committing to the same codebase
  • Train designers in git and ruby and other things
  • Designers are motivated to learn so they can make changes directly: it gives them more power

Nick Gauthier - Grease your Suite

Les Hill and Jim Remsik - Sustainably Awesome

  • Comfortable and productive environment is crucial
  • sustainable pace is important. 40h weeks.
  • cargo culting
  • Pet friendly
  • The point is not to do what we do, but to recognize our goals. Don't cargo cult these tips!
  • Casual
  • No Micromanagement
  • Don't penny pinch
  • Keep a budget and spend it wisely
  • $400 per week grocery budget
  • No death marches
  • No meetings (except daily standup and project standup and monthly company status meeting)
  • No hierarchy
  • No future-proofing (software and organizational practices)
  • What do you do when a developer rm -rfs?
    • No sudo for devs?
    • 3 manager approval before running a script?
    • Develop a backup solution and a common machine image?
  • "Process is an embedded reaction to prior stupidity" - Clay Shirky
  • A project came along that needed work done ASAP
  • Crafted an MVP and built it without changing their process
  • The MVP did not overlap with their mockups and specs
  • Started with story cards and team boards
  • Moved to pivotal tracker
  • Tim Pope had a suggestion about how to work stories in pivotal that worked really well
  • Always open to try new things and experiment with new processes
  • Enjoy your work
  • Don't hire people you don't like, or without passion
  • Hire smart people that get things done
  • Must be a great cultural fit
  • Hiring
    • phone screening
    • week long "test drive"
    • gems you use are important
    • editors you use are important
    • test driven (and test-first) style
    • hang out after hours to check for a cultural fit
  • "If I'm not saying 'hell yeah!' about something, then I say no" - Derek Sivers
  • Firing: due to lack of communication or mistake, probably on both sides
  • Fire fast, but with compassion
  • Approach building a team the same way you build software

Yehuda Katz - Rails 3

  • Rails core family is getting bigger
  • Rails 2 was very intertwined
  • Broke things up cleanly
  • Instead of Railties being a big glue layer w/ initialization stack, it became a small part or Rails 3 and specifies the framework for applications and engines
  • Engines are special plugins now that inherit from Railties
  • Applications inherit from Engines
  • Railtie lets you add features to rails
  • Railties provide a series of Hooks
  • Inheriting from Railtie doesn't do anything, but it has lots of functionality
  • Railtie lets you configure the application, such as pull in generators
  • Rake Tasks are another Railtie Hook
    • Extra stuff you want to have happen in rake, and not on boot
      rake_tasks do
      load "my_stuff/my_tasks.rake"
      end
  • before_configuration hook = right inside Rails::Application, before user stuff happens, but you know about rails root and stuff.
  • config.to_prepare : in dev, run every time, in production, run once (i.e. compass template compilation)
  • Framework loading: ActiveSupport.on_load = i.e. when action mailer loads, monkey patch in some code. Then you don't have to try to detect ActionMailer, you just say, when it loads do stuff.
  • Don't do if(defined) because it depends on order
  • Decouple via Instrumentation
  • ActiveSupport::Notifications.instrument("receive.action_mailer") do |payload|; #callback; end
  • Worth Noting: we worked really hard making things mostly backwards compatible
  • The old way may appear to work, even if it doesn't
  • AbstractController is decoupled from ActionController
  • ActionDispatch = Rack++
  • ActiveModel lets other persistence engines connect to ActionController. Only need to support ~5 methods
  • Tight Integration without Coupling
  • Integration first, decouple later
  • Migrating:
    1. Install Rails 2.3.9.
    2. bundler
    3. rails_xss
    4. Deprecations - get the count to 0
    5. Upgrade
    6. Deprecations again!
  • Helpers should call partials, not generate html
  • Rails 3.1: We're not burned out!
    • Engines
    • @drogus did all the engine work
    • Engine Migrations
    • Static assets (w/o copying). Leave it in the engine, and Rack::Static will find it
    • Self-contained engine
    • Built-in http caching, to get away from filesystem caching
    • fresh_when? calculates an etag from the post and returns 304 if not fresh
    • caching at the browser layer
    • etag can be based on an AR object
    • If you have Varnish, you can turn off Rack::Cache and fresh_when will be built in
    • This also means that when you turn on Akamai, you already have all the code that makes it work well
    • Enables Edge-Cached SCSS
    • Rack::Cache is like Memcache, but uses HTTP semantics
    • Assets
    • ERB == SCSS (I have content that needs to be processed before it hits the browser)
    • Solution: build in compilation pipeline
    • app.css.scss (like app.html.erb)
    • posts/index.css.scss
    • Treats CSS the same as HTML for templating
    • SCSS template handler => http response => rack::cache
    • It just works w/ varnish and the like
    • Spriting
    • Compass and lemonade are merging w/ a new sprite api
    • Put all your images in images/sprites/ 1, 2, 3, 4, .png
    • Lets you include all the images as a sprite
    • Gives you a bunch of css classes to use the sprites
    • SCSS can take CSS, and then add stuff in
    • You don't need imagemagick, there is a pure ruby PNG spriting library
    • AutoFlush - it's cool, read his blog, running out of time
    • flush content to the browser as it is rendering
    • Tradeoffs you have to deal with, like exceptions
    • Browser can be working on your CSS while you are doing SQL queries
    • Keep content_for at the top of the template
    • Exceptron
    • Stolen from merb
    • ExceptionsController to render and take actions when exceptions happen
    • Performance
    • We did pretty well in 3.0, definitely some trouble spots
    • More mechanisms for performance
    • Big Arel rewrite for 3.1
    • Possible to get to 2x faster over 3.0

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Links from RailsConf 2013

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